Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCohen, Cheryl Susan
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-12T18:55:21Z
dc.date.available2018-07-12T18:55:21Z
dc.date.issued1998
dc.identifier.citationSource: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 60-02, Section: B, page: 8220.
dc.identifier.urihttp://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqm&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:9919365
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/3804
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated whether lack of social support is negatively associated with depressive symptoms and diagnoses through the mediation of hopelessness. Measures of social support, hopelessness, and depression were administered to 103 HIV+ and HIV- male and female injecting drug users and readministered six months later. The mediational model was tested both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Results were mixed. Findings were consistent with the mediational hypothesis in the cross-sectional model predicting diagnosis of major depression, indicating that hopelessness completely accounted for the significant negative relationship between social support and likelihood of depressive diagnosis. When hopelessness was controlled, the significant relationship between social support and depressive diagnosis was eliminated. Findings were consistent with the mediational hypothesis in the cross-sectional model predicting depressive symptoms, indicating that hopelessness partially accounted for the significant negative relationship between social support and depressive symptoms. When hopelessness was controlled, the relationship between social support and depressive symptoms was considerably attenuated, though not eliminated.;Evidence for mediation was less strong in the longitudinal findings. In the longitudinal model predicting depressive symptoms, findings indicated that change in hopelessness partially accounted for the relationship between change in social support and change in depressive symptoms, but the attenuation in the relationship due to change in hopelessness was modest. No evidence of mediation was found in the longitudinal model predicting diagnosis of depression.;These findings suggest that hopelessness accounts at least in part for the impact of low levels of support on depression. They also provide evidence for the direct impact of social support on depression, and suggest that some additional unexplained mechanism or mechanisms may similarly have a direct effect on depression. Clinical, theoretical, and research implications of these findings are discussed.
dc.publisherProQuest Dissertations & Theses
dc.subjectClinical psychology.
dc.subjectMental health.
dc.subjectSocial psychology.
dc.subjectBehavioral psychology.
dc.subjectPersonality psychology.
dc.titleSocial support, hopelessness, and depression in HIV+ injecting drug users
dc.typeDissertation


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record