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dc.contributor.authorNagel, Meira
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-08T20:28:54Z
dc.date.available2018-11-08T20:28:54Z
dc.date.issued2016-04
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/4164
dc.identifier.urihttps://yulib002.mc.yu.edu/login?url=https://repository.yu.edu/handle/20.500.12202/4164
dc.descriptionThe file is restricted for YU community access only.
dc.description.abstractTelling stories has been an innate human drive since the beginning—since Adam relayed to Eve that G-d had told him not to eat from the tree of knowledge1 . Walter Fisher, a 20th century philosopher, proposed that all meaningful communication is a form of storytelling, of narrative— that “humans are essentially storytellers2 .” We see stories being told in all aspects of the human experience: from teachers in the classroom describing the Civil War to a millennial anxiously texting her friend the latest boy drama. Storytelling, in fact, is so much a part of who we are and what we do as humans that it is often hard to pinpoint what exactly it means to be telling a story. One area in which it is especially crucial to analyze the power of a complex narrative is that of a legal battle. In this arena, the details and nuance of a story can drastically alter the trajectory of a person’s life. Perhaps this is nowhere more important than in a custody case. We need only recall the oldest recorded case to realize the significance of narrative and the many shades of gray a custody case contains:en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipS. Daniel Abraham Honors Programen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherStern College for Womenen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectNarration (Rhetoric)en_US
dc.subjectRhetoric.en_US
dc.subjectCommunication in law.en_US
dc.subjectForensic oratory.en_US
dc.titleNarrative and Rhetoric in Lawen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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  • Honors Student Theses [208]
    Senior honors theses sponsored by the S. Daniel Abraham Honors Program of Stern College for Women

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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
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