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dc.contributor.authorBerman, Shai J.
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-12T20:32:21Z
dc.date.available2018-11-12T20:32:21Z
dc.date.issued2016-09
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/4213
dc.description.abstractWhen Julius Caesar crossed the Rubicon River in early 49 B.C.E.1 and proceeded to march on Rome, he set in motion a series of events which would culminate in the transformation of the Roman state. Never again would the Senate, magistrates, Tribunes, or plebeian assemblies have any claim to real power; a dictator, and eventually an emperor, would become the effective ruler of Rome. What some do not realize, however, is that Caesar’s march on Rome was not unprecedented. Forty years earlier, in 88, Lucius Cornelius Sulla, an accomplished military general who served as consul that year, lead his army into Rome. Sulla sought to reclaim the command in the campaign against Mithridates VI of Pontus which he believed had been wrongfully transferred from him to Gaius Marius by the legislation of the tribune Publius Sulpicius Rufus. Sulla’s march on Rome proved successful. Sulpicius and Marius were overpowered and Sulla gained control of the cityen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipJay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Programen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherYeshiva Collegeen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectSulla, Lucius Cornelius.en_US
dc.subjectStatesmen --Rome --Biography.en_US
dc.subjectRome --History --Republic, 265-30 B.C.en_US
dc.titleUNRAVELING THE STORY OF LUCIUS CORNELIUS SULLAen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States