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dc.contributor.authorFriedman, Joseph ("Yosie")
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-11T14:48:52Z
dc.date.available2019-04-11T14:48:52Z
dc.date.issued2018-09
dc.identifier.citationThe Power(s) in Love: The Variation of Dyadic Power Across Relationship Domains in Romantic Couples. Friedman, Joseph ("Yosie"). Thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program, Yeshiva College, Yeshiva University, May 2018.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/4346
dc.identifier.urihttps://yulib002.mc.yu.edu/login?url=https://repository.yu.edu/handle/20.500.12202/4346
dc.descriptionThe file is restricted for YU community access only.en_US
dc.description.abstractBased on previous findings in the social power literature and romantic relationships literature, we predicted that the power dynamics in romantic relationships would vary across domains rather than stay the same. In support of our prediction, we found that, for the majority of couples, actual power roles flip from one domain to the next and, furthermore, for the overwhelming majority of couples, power roles flip at least “half-way.” These findings suggest that multiple domain-specific power structures, rather than a single global power structure, govern dyadic relationships and, thus, that dyadic power is not an all-or-nothing construct. However, we failed to find parallel perceived power results in support of power variation. This study also investigated the association between power and the two power related constructs of gender ideology and relationship quality. Equitable divisions of actual power and perceived power were associated with more egalitarian gender ideologies and enhanced relationship quality. In addition, more traditional divisions of actual power were linked to men’s more traditional gender ideologies and women’s perceptions of more traditional divisions of power were linked to their holding more traditional gender ideologies. Finally, we found associations between how equal power is achieved and relationship quality: perceptions of “dividing and conquering” were linked to enhanced relationship quality for both sexes. When it came to actual power, the two sexes split in terms of their preferred method of balance such that females’ relationship quality was positively associated with balance achieved through dividing and conquering while males’ relationship quality was positively associated with balance achieved through collaboration.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipJay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program Mentor: Professor Jenny Isaacs, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Yeshiva College.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherYeshiva College. Yeshiva University.en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectromantic relationshipsen_US
dc.subjectsocial poweren_US
dc.subjectpower dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectdyadic relationshipsen_US
dc.subjectgender ideologyen_US
dc.subjectrelationship qualityen_US
dc.subjectdivisions of poweren_US
dc.subjectdyadic poweren_US
dc.subjectvariation of poweren_US
dc.titleThe Power(s) in Love: The Variation of Dyadic Power Across Relationship Domains in Romantic Couples.en_US
dc.title.alternativeThesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program, Yeshiva College, Yeshiva University, May 2018.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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