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dc.contributor.authorPollack, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorKleinman, Toby
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-05T15:45:44Z
dc.date.available2020-11-05T15:45:44Z
dc.date.issued2020-11
dc.identifier.citationPollack, Daniel and Kleinman, Toby. (November 4, 2020). Domestic violence and mental health issues in court. New York Law Journal.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.law.com/newyorklawjournal/2020/11/04/domestic-violence-and-mental-health-issues-in-court/en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/6337
dc.descriptionAnalysis/ Articleen_US
dc.description.abstractWhether a domestic violence victim is representing herself or being represented by an attorney, the goal is the same: Convince the court of her own veracity and be skeptical of the other side. How is that possible when a pejorative mental health label may have been pinned onto her? In their Family Law column, Daniel Pollack and Toby Kleinman examine ways for an accuser to bolster credibility.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherALM (formerly American Lawyer Media)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNew York Law Journal;November 4, 2020
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectdomestic violenceen_US
dc.subjectMental health disordersen_US
dc.subjectFamily Lawen_US
dc.subjectcredibilityen_US
dc.subjectreliabilityen_US
dc.titleDomestic violence and mental health issues in court.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States