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dc.contributor.authorFrank, Rachel Rubin
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-12T17:38:10Z
dc.date.available2018-07-12T17:38:10Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationSource: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 73-06, Section: B, page: 3948.;Advisors: Charles Swencionis.
dc.identifier.urihttps://yulib002.mc.yu.edu/login?url=http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqm&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:3500728
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/1281
dc.description.abstractObjective: The aim of the study was to examine whether binge eating disorder, depression, reversed vegetative symptoms of atypical depression, emotional eating, external eating, restrained eating, and perceived stress are associated with weight loss and attrition in obese binge eaters and non binge eaters enrolled in a behavioral weight loss diet. Method: The sample consisted of 90 obese participants enrolled in a 30 day low calorie liquid diet + behavioral therapy program. Binge Eating Disorder was assessed with the Questionnaire on Eating and Weight Patterns (QEWP), mood was assessed with the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) and Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS), eating disordered behavior was assessed with the Emotional Eating and Appetite Questionnaire (EMAQ), the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ). Results: Binge eaters had higher levels of depression, reversed vegetative symptoms of atypical depression, negative emotional eating, external eating and perceived stress compared to non-binge eaters. After one month on the diet, significant decreases were observed in weight, and reversed vegetative symptoms of atypical depression in binge eaters, Binge eating, along with the other psychosocial measures did not predict weight loss or attrition. No moderators were identified as well. Discussion: Binge eaters performed as well as non-binge eaters, with similar weight loss and attrition outcomes, highlighting that behavioral weight loss programs should not be ruled out as a potential weight loss treatment for binge eaters. The identification of predictors and moderators of weight loss and attrition remains an elusive goal.
dc.publisherProQuest Dissertations & Theses
dc.subjectClinical psychology.
dc.titleWill binge eating impact weight loss and attrition on a weight loss diet?
dc.typeDissertation


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