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dc.contributor.authorCASGRAIN, PETER B.
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-12T18:06:56Z
dc.date.available2018-07-12T18:06:56Z
dc.date.issued1980
dc.identifier.citationSource: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 41-04, Section: B, page: 1563.
dc.identifier.urihttps://yulib002.mc.yu.edu/login?url=http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqm&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:8021230
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/2637
dc.description.abstractIn an effort to expand upon Fritz Heider's interpersonal balance theory, simple vignettes were constructed for the dimensions of competence and power as well as sentiment using Heiderian "pox" configurations. Also, complex vignettes were constructed incorporating all three dimensions. Both simple and complex vignettes were presented to subjects who were instructed to rate the situations as to degree of pleasantness/unpleasantness.;The core hypotheses for this study were: Hypothesis I. A balanced simple sentiment vignette will be significantly changed toward imbalance by adding negative competence and power aspects. Hypothesis II: An imbalanced simple sentiment vignette will be significantly changed toward balance by adding positive competence and power aspects.;Findings in this study indicated that it was possible to use parameters other than sentiment within Heider's basic model of cognitive balance by devising comparable aspects for competence and power. Additions of competence and power, when combined with various simple sentiment vignettes, showed the potential to significantly alter a balanced or imbalanced simple sentiment situation. Comparisons between balanced or imbalanced simple sentiment vignettes and comparable complex vignettes confirmed both of the hypotheses.;Various interactions among sentiment, competence, and power were also explored. The study included an examination of similarities and differences among the simple sentiment, competence, and power vignettes. Overall, there were no significant differences among sentiment, competence, and power scores. Individual comparisons between comparable sentiment and competence situations and comparable sentiment and power situations which were significant were discussed. Also, gender differences for all the simple and complex vignettes were measured and briefly explored. There were only two gender differences significant at the .01 level and five gender differences significant at the .05 level.;Finally, criticisms and suggestions for future research within the field of interpersonal relations were proposed.
dc.publisherProQuest Dissertations & Theses
dc.subjectSocial psychology.
dc.titleCOMPETENCE AND POWER APPLIED TO HEIDER'S BALANCE THEORY
dc.typeDissertation


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