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dc.contributor.authorShapiro, Sylvia
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-12T18:28:44Z
dc.date.available2018-07-12T18:28:44Z
dc.date.issued1988
dc.identifier.citationSource: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 49-10, Section: A, page: 3160.;Advisors: Irving N. Levitz.
dc.identifier.urihttps://yulib002.mc.yu.edu/login?url=http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqm&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:8827856
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/3237
dc.description.abstractLittle is known about the role of adult significant others in facilitating children's adjustment to divorce. This study was undertaken to examine this important issue.;The research hypotheses were: (1) Children with a supportive relationship with their father and children with a supportive relationship with another adult will adjust better to divorce than children with neither kind of relationship. (2) Children without a supportive relationship with their father, but with such a relationship with another adult, will adjust as well to divorce as children with a supportive relationship with their father. (3) There will be no difference between the adjustment of children for whom the other adult they maintain a supportive relationship is a male and those for whom it is a female.;Three indicators of adjustment were examined: self-esteem, academic performance, and cooperative school behavior.;Hypothesis 1 was partially upheld. While the group that maintained a warm and supportive relationship with their father did manifest better adjustment than the other two groups, the group that had a supportive relationship with another adult did not achieve significantly higher scores on any of the outcomes than the group with no adult relationship.;Hypothesis 2 was partially upheld. While there were no significant differences between the adjustment of children with a supportive relationship with the father and those with such a relationship with another adult on academic performance and cooperative behavior at school, the former had higher self-esteem.;Hypothesis 3 was upheld. No significant differences on any of the outcomes were found between those children who maintained a supportive relationship with a male adult and those maintaining such a relationship with a female adult.;While all hypotheses were not fully substantiated, an examination of the trends in the data indicate that while children maintaining a supportive relationship with another adult do not adjust as well as those maintaining such a relationship with their father, they adjust better than those children who do not have a supportive relationship with either their father or another adult.
dc.publisherProQuest Dissertations & Theses
dc.subjectSocial work.
dc.titleThe impact of adult significant others on children of divorce
dc.typeDissertation


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