Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSieger, Ariella
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-18T15:00:26Z
dc.date.available2018-10-18T15:00:26Z
dc.date.issued2015-04-27
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/3994
dc.identifier.urihttps://yulib002.mc.yu.edu/login?url=https://repository.yu.edu/handle/20.500.12202/3994
dc.descriptionThe file is restricted for YU community access only.en_US
dc.description.abstractMotivational Interviewing (MI) is a counseling method developed by Miller and Rollnick in 1991 that has been researched and applied widely to effect behavioral change in a broad range of cases including drugs, psychology, and health. This review explores the efficacy of MI as well as the various components of MI that may be responsible for its success relative to other Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) methods specifically in pediatric obesity. These components include autonomy, motivation, and self-determination that allow children to feel more involved in the process of dietetic intervention and may help them stay committed to their lifestyle changes, rather than approaches that focus on exclusively parental intervention and control of their diets. Furthermore, through a review of a plethora of studies about MI, there is evidence to suggest that the principles of MI, as isolated concepts, can and should be integrated by parents as methods to prevent future cases of obesity in youth and adolescents.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipS. Daniel Abraham Honors Programen_US
dc.publisherStern College for Womenen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.titlePrinciples of Motivational Interviewing as Key Factors in Pediatric Obesity Intervention and Preventionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States