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dc.contributor.authorPollack, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T21:35:49Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T21:35:49Z
dc.date.issued2018-12
dc.identifier.citationPollack, Daniel (December 2018). Sexting, Schools, and Law Enforcement: Where Does Child Protective Services Fit In? Policy & Practice 76(6): 25.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1942-6828
dc.identifier.urihttps://search.proquest.com/docview/2160691069?accountid=15178en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/4728
dc.descriptionLegal notesen_US
dc.description.abstractIn a 2017 study of a private high school, researchers found that 15.8 percent of males and 13.6 percent of females sent sexts; 40.5 percent of males and 30.6 percent of females received them.1 A 2016 study in the Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law found that the rate of "minors who have sent sexual images range from 4 to 25 percent, depending on the age of the youths surveyed, the content of the messages and other factors. "2 Legal Implications From a legal vantage point, sexting may violate child pornography laws, possession and distribution laws, obscenity statutes, and other offenses.3 The resulting severe penalties may include prison terms, fines, require the offender to formally register indefinitely as a sex offender, and cause the offender future high employment hurdles. A minor who violates subsection 1: (a) For the first violation: (1) Is a child in need of supervision, as that term is used in title 5 of NRS, and is not a delinquent child; and (2) Is not considered a sex offender or juvenile sex offender and is not subject to registration or community notification as a juvenile sex offender pursuant to title 5 of NRS, or as a sex offender pursuant to NRS 179D.010 to 179D.550, inclusive. (b) For the second or a subsequent violation: (1) Commits a delinquent act, and the court may order the detention of the minor in the same manner as if the minor had committed an act that would have been a misdemeanor if committed by an adult; and (2) Is not considered a sex offender or juvenile sex offender and is not subject to registration or community notification as a juvenile sex offender pursuant to title 5 of NRS, or as a sex offender pursuant to NRS 179D.010 to 179D.550, inclusive. 5. A minor who violates subsection 2: (a) Commits a delinquent act, and the court may order the detention of the minor in the same manner as if the minor had committed an act that would have been a misdemeanor if committed by an adult; and (b) Is not considered a sex offender or juvenile sex offender and is not subject to registration or community notification as a juvenile sex offender pursuant to title 5 of NRS, or as a sex offender pursuant to NRS 179D.010 to 179D.550, inclusive.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Public Human Services Association-APHSAen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPolicy & Practice;76(6)
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectsex offendersen_US
dc.subjectphotographsen_US
dc.subjectlaw enforcementen_US
dc.subjectageen_US
dc.subjectpornography & obscenityen_US
dc.subjectself-destructive behavioren_US
dc.subjectfines & penaltiesen_US
dc.subjectchildren & youthen_US
dc.subjectregistrationen_US
dc.subjectjuvenile offendersen_US
dc.subjectsex crimesen_US
dc.subjecttext messagingen_US
dc.titleSexting, Schools, and Law Enforcement: Where Does Child Protective Services Fit In?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States