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dc.contributor.authorKleinman, Toby G.
dc.contributor.authorPollack, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-26T16:35:32Z
dc.date.available2019-09-26T16:35:32Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-11
dc.identifier.citationKleinman, Toby ; Pollack, Daniel. (July 11, 2018). Domestic Violence: Do's and Don'ts for Court. New York Law Journal. ALM Media Properties, LLC.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0028-7326
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.law.com/newyorklawjournal/2018/07/11/071218kleinman/en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/4741
dc.descriptionscholarly articleen_US
dc.description.abstractIn every hearing to determine domestic violence, a court is faced with the dilemma of whether to grant or deny protection to a named plaintiff. Each state uses a different standard of proof, but the procedures are similar. Presenting a good case may positively affect later child custody decisions and distribution of assets where there is a civil case for damages.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherALM Media Properties, LLC.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesThe New York Law Journal;July 11, 2018
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectdomestic violenceen_US
dc.subjectvictim defendantsen_US
dc.subjectStandard of proof (civil v. standard)en_US
dc.subjectrestraining orderen_US
dc.subjectbest practicesen_US
dc.subjectDefendant victims --Preparation and coachinen_US
dc.subjectTestimony -- Domestic violence courtsen_US
dc.subjectEvidence in court -- Proceduresen_US
dc.subjectorders of protectionen_US
dc.titleDomestic Violence: Do's and Don'ts for Court.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States