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dc.contributor.advisorWitty, Emily Amie
dc.contributor.authorSilvera, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-09T13:51:01Z
dc.date.available2020-06-09T13:51:01Z
dc.date.issued2020-05
dc.identifier.citationSilvera, Rachel. Teaching the Holocaust Through Museum Visits: Are Our Students Getting the Full History? Presented to the S. Daniel Abraham Honors Program in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for Completion of the Program. NY: Stern College for Women. Yeshiva University, May 2020en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/5612
dc.descriptionSenior honors thesis. OPT OUT: Please contact yair@yu.edu to request the access.en_US
dc.description.abstractAcross the United States of America, many states mandate teaching the Holocaust. Additionally, many Jewish schools, though not required by law, choose to teach the Holocaust. Formal curricular instruction on Holocaust education is often followed by an educational visit to a Holocaust museum in the area. This paper will focus on the three museums connected to the Jewish educational community in the New York metropolitan area: The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., the Amud Aish Memorial Museum in Brooklyn, NY, and the Museum of Jewish Heritage: A Living Memorial to the Holocaust in New York, NY. Administrators of Jewish schools often decide about the museums they will visit based on geographical considerations, including proximity to the school. Many Modern-Orthodox Jewish day schools in the New York metropolitan area take their eighth graders on a graduation trip to the nation’s capital in Washington D.C., to see historical landmarks. While there, they also visit the USHMM. Using data from interviews with senior members of each museum’s staff and personal visits to each site, this study examines how each museum defines the Holocaust and tells the narrative of the Holocaust. This study examines how each exhibit was designed, including the artifacts displayed, and which aspects of the Holocaust are emphasized. Suggestions about the importance of examining the educational philosophy and underlying messages that each museum teaches are recommended for Modern-Orthodox Jewish day school administrators.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipS. Daniel Abraham Honors Programen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNew York, NY: Stern College for Women. Yeshiva University.en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectSenior honors thesisen_US
dc.subjectHolocaust educationen_US
dc.subjectHolocaust museumsen_US
dc.subjectJewish educationen_US
dc.subjectModern-Orthodox Jewish day schoolsen_US
dc.titleTeaching the Holocaust Through Museum Visits: Are Our Students Getting the Full History?en_US
dc.typeNewspaperen_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States