Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKanarfogel, Ephraim
dc.contributor.editorKanarfogel, Ephraim
dc.contributor.editorFishman, Talya
dc.contributor.editorCastaño, Javier,
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-07T18:57:19Z
dc.date.available2020-12-07T18:57:19Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationKanarfogel, Ephraim. From Germany to Northern France and Back Again: A Tale of Two Tosafist Centres. n Talya Fishman and Ephraim Kanarfogel, eds., Regional Identities and Cultures of Medieval Jews (Oxford: Littman Library, 2018), 149-171.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781786949905
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.academia.edu/36761029/Ephraim_Kanarfogel_From_Germany_to_Northern_France_and_Back_Again_A_Tale_of_Two_Tosafist_Centres_in_Talya_Fishman_and_Ephraim_Kanarfogel_eds_Regional_Identities_and_Cultures_of_Medieval_Jews_Oxford_Littman_Library_2018_149_171en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/6481
dc.descriptionScholarly book chapteren_US
dc.description.abstract"Though the existence of Jewish regional cultures is widely known, the origins of the most prominent groups, Ashkenaz and Sepharad, are poorly understood, and the rich variety of other regional Jewish identities is often overlooked. Yet all these subcultures emerged in the Middle Ages. Scholars contributing to the present study were invited to consider how such regional identities were fashioned, propagated, reinforced, contested, and reshaped--and to reflect on the developments, events, or encounters that made these identities manifest. They were asked to identify how subcultural identities proved to be useful, and the circumstances in which they were deployed. The resulting volume spans the ninth to the sixteenth centuries, and explores Jewish cultural developments in western Europe, the Balkans, North Africa, and Asia Minor. In its own way, each contribution considers factors--demographic, geographical, historical, economic, political, institutional, legal, intellectual, theological, cultural, and even biological--that led medieval Jews to conceive of themselves, or to be perceived by others, as bearers of a discrete Jewish regional identity. Notwithstanding the singularity of each essay, they collectively attest to the inherent dynamism of Jewish regional identities" --en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherLondon : The Littman Library of Jewish Civilization ; Liverpool : in association with Liverpool University Pressen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjecttosafist centresen_US
dc.subjectJewish historyen_US
dc.subjectJews in medieval Franceen_US
dc.subjectJews in medieval Germanyen_US
dc.subjectmedieval Ashkenazen_US
dc.titleFrom Germany to Northern France and Back Again: A Tale of Two Tosafist Centres.en_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
local.yu.facultypagehttps://www.yu.edu/faculty/pages/kanarfogel-ephraim


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States