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dc.contributor.authorStein, Gary L.
dc.contributor.authorCagle, John G.
dc.contributor.authorChrist, Grace H.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-26T14:18:47Z
dc.date.available2018-06-26T14:18:47Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationStein, G.L., Cagle, J.G., & Christ, G. 2017. Social work involvement in advance care planning: Findings from a large survey of social works in hospice and palliative care settings. Journal of Palliative Medicine 20(3): 253-259.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1557-7740
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/65
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1089/jpm.2016.0352
dc.description.abstractBackground: Few data are available describing the involvement and activities of social workers in advance care planning (ACP). Objective: We sought to provide data about (1) social worker involvement and leadership in ACP conversations with patients and families; and (2) the extent of functions and activities when these discussions occur. Methods: We conducted a large web-based survey of social workers employed in hospice, palliative care, and related settings to explore their role, participation, and self-rated competency in facilitating ACP discussions. Respondents were recruited through the Social Work Hospice and Palliative Care Network and the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. Descriptive analyses were conducted on the full sample of respondents (N = 641) and a subsample of clinical social workers (N = 456). Responses were analyzed to explore differences in ACP involvement by practice setting. Results: Most clinical social workers (96%) reported that social workers in their department are conducting ACP discussions with patients/families. Majorities also participate in, and lead, ACP discussions (69% and 60%, respectively). Most respondents report that social workers are responsible for educating patients/families about ACP options (80%) and are the team members responsible for documenting ACP (68%). Compared with other settings, oncology and inpatient palliative care social workers were less likely to be responsible for ensuring that patients/families are informed of ACP options and documenting ACP preferences. Conclusions: Social workers are prominently involved in facilitating, leading, and documenting ACP discussions. Policy-makers, administrators, and providers should incorporate the vital contributions of social work professionals in policies and programs supporting ACP.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Palliative Medicineen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectadvance care planningen_US
dc.subjectcommunicationen_US
dc.subjectsocial worken_US
dc.titleSocial work involvement in advance care planning: Findings from a large survey of social works in hospice and palliative care settings.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.typearticle
dc.type


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