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dc.contributor.authorRavid, S. Abraham
dc.contributor.authorBasuroy, Suman
dc.contributor.authorChatterjee, Subimal
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-16T19:25:27Z
dc.date.available2021-03-16T19:25:27Z
dc.date.issued2003-10
dc.identifier.citationRavid, S.A., Basuroy, S. & Chatterjee, S. (2003). How critical are critical reviews? The box office effects of film critics, star power, and budgets. Journal of Marketing, 67(4), 113-117. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1509/jmkg.67.4.103.18692en_US
dc.identifier.issnPrint: 0022-2429 Electronic: 1547-7185
dc.identifier.urihttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1509/jmkg.67.4.103.18692en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/6664
dc.descriptionScholarly article / Open accessen_US
dc.description.abstractThe authors investigate how critics affect the box office performance of films and how the effects may be moderated by stars and budgets. The authors examine the process through which critics affect box office revenue, that is, whether they influence the decision of the film going public (their role as influencers), merely predict the decision (their role as predictors), or do both. They find that both positive and negative reviews are correlated with weekly box office revenue over an eight-week period, suggesting that critics play a dual role: They can influence and predict box office revenue. However, the authors find the impact of negative reviews (but not positive reviews)to diminish over time, a pattern that is more consistent with critics’ role as influencers. The authors then compare the positive impact of good reviews with the negative impact of bad reviews to find that film reviews evidence a negativity bias; that is, negative reviews hurt performance more than positive reviews help performance, but only during the first week of a film’s run. Finally, the authors examine two key moderators of critical reviews, stars and budgets, and find that popular stars and big budgets enhance box office revenue for films that receive more negative critical reviews than positive critical reviews but do little for films that receive more positive reviews than negative reviews. Taken together, the findings not only replicate and extend prior research on critical reviews and box office performance but also offer insight into how film studios can strategically manage the review process to enhance box office revenue.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipRavid thanks the New Jersey Center for Research at Rutgers University and the Stern School at New York University for research support. All authors thank Kalpesh Desai, Paul Dho-lakia, Wagner Kamakura, Matt Clayton, Rob Engle, William Greene, Kose John, and the three anonymous JM reviewers for many helpful suggestions. The authors owe special thanks to Shailendra Gajanan, SubalKumbhakar, and Nagesh Revankar for many discussions on econometricsen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Marketing;67(4)
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectbox office performanceen_US
dc.subjectinfluencersen_US
dc.subjectcriticsen_US
dc.subjectreviewsen_US
dc.subjectstar poweren_US
dc.titleHow critical are critical reviews? The box office effects of film critics, star power, and budgets.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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