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dc.contributor.authorMinier, Luis H.
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-12T17:34:45Z
dc.date.available2018-07-12T17:34:45Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationSource: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 69-01, Section: A, page: 3810.;Advisors: Charles Auerbach.
dc.identifier.urihttps://yulib002.mc.yu.edu/login?url=http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&res_dat=xri:pqm&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:3300299
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/948
dc.description.abstractThis explanatory/cross-sectional study examined the level of HIV/AIDS stigma in the Washington Heights community in New York City. It measured the level of HIV/AIDS stigma in the different ethnic communities in Washington Heights and it compared the largest three communities: African-American, White, and Latino. The theoretical framework of this study is the structural violence theory that explains the existence of HIV/AIDS stigma within a social and economic schema that allows its victims to live in fear, possibly developing stigma towards people living with HIV/AIDS. Data collection for the analysis of survey results from registered voters and members of parents associations were done from October 2006 to October 2007. The results provide some evidence to support policy changes to increase HIV/AIDS education and prevention programs in Latino communities.
dc.publisherProQuest Dissertations & Theses
dc.subjectSocial work.
dc.subjectHispanic American studies.
dc.subjectBlack studies.
dc.subjectSocial structure.
dc.titleHIV/AIDS stigma in the Washington Heights community
dc.typeDissertation


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