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dc.contributor.authorAngel, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-30T21:51:17Z
dc.date.available2019-07-30T21:51:17Z
dc.date.issued2014-08
dc.identifier.citationAngel, Joseph. (August 2014). Angels. In Oxford Bibliogrpahies Online (Biblical Studies). August, 2014, modified 27Feb2019.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9780195393361
dc.identifier.urihttp://doi.org/10.1093/obo/9780195393361-0079en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/4543
dc.descriptionSigned bibliographyen_US
dc.description.abstractAngels are supernatural beings who serve a variety of functions in biblical literature. The term most often used to denote angels in the Hebrew Bible, mal’ak, means “messenger.” The Septuagint frequently translates mal’ak with the Greek angelos, from which the English word “angel” derives. While angels are mentioned several times in the earlier writings of the Hebrew Bible, in the literature of the Second Temple period a veritable explosion of interest in them is found. Jewish writings of this era exhibit a sustained interest in identifying the various ranks and orders of the angels as well as in naming individual angels and delineating their specific functions. The extensive angelological speculation of this period deeply influenced later forms of Judaism and as well as constituting an important element of the Jewish heritage of early Christianity.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectangelsen_US
dc.subjectBibleen_US
dc.subjectbibliographyen_US
dc.titleAngels.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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