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dc.contributor.authorAngel, Joseph L.
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-01T14:37:28Z
dc.date.available2019-08-01T14:37:28Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationAngel, Joseph L. (2016). “The Humbling of the Arrogant and the ‘Wild Man’ and ‘Tree Stump’ Traditions in the Book of Giants and Daniel 4.” Pages 61–80 in Tales of Giants from Qumran and Turfan: Ancient Contexts, Traditions and Influences. Edited by L.T. Stuckenbruck, M. Goff, and E. Morano. WUNT 360. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0512-1604
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/4551
dc.identifier.urihttps://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/yeshiva-ebooks/reader.action?docID=4621917&ppg=74en_US
dc.descriptionAcademic presentation delivered at International conference held at Ludwig-Maximilians- Universität. Munich, Germany. June, 2014.en_US
dc.description.abstractThere is no question that the Qumran Book of Giants, with its focus on the violence perpetrated by the progeny of the watchers and the elevated role of the patriarch Enoch in the revelation of divine judgment, belongs to the early Enochic tradition. There is, in fact, increasing agreement among scholars that the work depends upon the Book of Watchers as a main source.1 One can point to significant thematic and ideological links between Giants and other early Enochic writings, such as the Book of Dreams and the Apocalypse of Weeks.2 Moreover, if J. T. Milik’s suggestion that 4Q203 and 4Q204 belong to the same manuscript is correct, then Giants was copied together with parts of the Watchers, Dreams, and the Epistle as early as the late first century BCE.3 At the same time, intriguing points of contact between the Book of Giants and a diverse array of ancient sources, including, for example, the Epic of Gilgamesh and Pseudo-Eupolemus, encourage us to broaden the scope and consider this composition within its wider literary and historical settings.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherMohr Siebecken_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWissenschaftliche Untersuchungen Zum Neuen Testament;360
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectBook of Giantsen_US
dc.subject"Wild Man"en_US
dc.subject"Tree Stump"en_US
dc.subjectQumranen_US
dc.subjectEnochic writingsen_US
dc.subjectAramaic Jewish traditionen_US
dc.subjectDanielic writingssen_US
dc.titleThe Humbling of the Arrogant and the “Wild Man” and “Tree Stump” Traditions in the Book of Giants and Daniel 4 .en_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US


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