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dc.contributor.advisorSantos, Lea F.
dc.contributor.authorBaitner, Miriam
dc.contributor.authorYeshiva University, degree granting institution.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-11T18:09:49Z
dc.date.available2020-06-11T18:09:49Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-22
dc.identifier.citationBaitner, Miriam. Stability of Doublons. Presented to the S. Daniel Abrahams Honors Program in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for Completion of the Program. NY: Stern College for Women. Yeshiva University May 22, 2020. Mentor: Professor Lea F. Santos, Physicsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12202/5641
dc.descriptionSenior honors thesis. Open Access.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this thesis, I discuss my research of the behavior and stability of doublons. I describe the dynamics of a one-dimensional closed chain of spins ½. I show that by analyzing the eigenstates and eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian that describes the system, I can predict its dynamics. In the presence of strong interactions between the particles in the chain, particles can bind in pairs of excitations forming what is known as doublons. These doublons are very stable and they move together as a single particle, but contrary to it, doublons move slowly. Doublons were observed experimentally by many different physicists with cold atoms. In those experiments, because of strong on-site interactions between atoms, they would see sites that were doubly occupied, which is how the term “doublon” was coined. These doublons could move to other sites, but they always moved together as a bounded pair. They were never found to be split up with one in each site, they always moved together. In my thesis, the doublons are equivalent to bounded pairs of neighboring excitations in a chain instead of pairs of atoms.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipS. Daniel Abraham Honors Programen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNew York, NY. Stern College for Women. Yeshiva University.en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectSenior honors thesisen_US
dc.subjectstability of doublonsen_US
dc.subjecteigenstatesen_US
dc.subjecteigenvaluesen_US
dc.subjectquantum mechanicsen_US
dc.subjectHamiltonian matrixen_US
dc.subjectquantum system predictionen_US
dc.subjectmathematical models, physicsen_US
dc.titleStability of Doublons.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
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